Cotehele to Calstock

A circular walk through the gardens of Cotehele to Calstock where Cornwall's largest Roman fort once stood, the Vikings allied with the Cornish to fight off the Saxons, and more recently railway wagons were lifted over 100ft by steam power from the quay to the top of the viaduct.

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The walk passes through Cotehele gardens and then circles the Danescombe valley on the way to Calstock Church. From here, the route joins the Tamar Discovery Trail, passing Okel Tor mine on its way to Calstock. The return route is along the River Tamar via Lower Kelly and Cotehele's chapel.

Reviews

A lovely walk, beautiful. This walk is very accessible despite Cornwall’s current rainfall

Vital statistics

  • OS Explorer: 108 (scan QR code on right to order from Amazon)
  • Distance: 5.9 miles/9.5 km
  • Grade: Moderate-strenuous
  • Start from: Cothele Quay Car Park
  • Parking: Cotehele Quay Car Park (NB. coins only) PL126TA. Follow signs to Cotehele, cross the bridge, and at the bend after the limekilns take the first right signposted Car Park for Quay and Mill
  • Recommended footwear: Walking shoes or trainers in summer; walking boots in winter.

OS maps for this walk

Click or tap on map for more info (blue=laminated)

Highlights

  • Cotehele House - a well-preserved Tudor mansion
  • Spectacular Victorian gardens with Mediaeval dovecot
  • Historic engine houses, quays and limekilns
  • Views along the River Tamar
  • Wildflowers including bluebells and orchids

Adjoining walks

Directions

  1. Make your way out of the car park and head towards the Discovery Centre until you reach The Edgcumbe and then bear right to follow the lane uphill to a junction with the road.

    The Shamrock was built in 1899 as a Tamar sailing barge, named after an irish entry to the Americas Cup Race in that year. After a long working life she ended up being used as a scrap iron store in Plymouth. She was rescued in 1973 and taken to Coethele where she was restored over 6 years. She is now the largest Tamar barge still fully working and occasionally makes trips up and down the river.

  2. When you reach the road, turn right up the drive to Cotehele House, signposted to the house and car park. Continue until you reach the car park on the right.

    By Victorian times, the parish of Calstock had more lime kilns than any other in Cornwall, with many of these along the river at Lower Kelly and Cotehele where coal and limestone were landed. Often culm (a local soft, peaty coal) was used as the fuel. The coal and limestone was loaded into the top of the kilns and was allowed to burn for a week; this produced quicklime which was raked out of the bottom. The lime from the kilns was transported by horse and cart to the nearby farms and market gardens.

  3. Keep left at the car park, signposted Overflow, then almost immediately turn right, signposted to House and Garden and follow the road to the Reception Area. Bear right through the Reception Area to reach a waymarked gate to the right of the buildings.

    Cotehele House belonged to the Edgcumbe family for nearly 600 years before being donated to the National Trust in 1947, together with over 1000 acres of land. The house is largely Tudor, and by the 1750s it was already attracting tourists seeking to visit a historic building.

  4. Go through the gate and follow the track, passing beneath the house and formal gardens. On the other side of the house, keep right to follow the track around a bend to the right. Follow the path to a junction of paths.

    The gardens at Cotehele were constructed during Victorian times and are now Grade II* listed in the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historical Interest. The formal Italian terraced gardens around the house are connected by a tunnel to the Valley Garden, which is planted with trees including rhododendrons and azaleas which produce profuse amounts of brightly-coloured flowers in spring. Within the Valley garden is a Victorian Summerhouse and former mediaeval elements including an exceptionally well-preserved dovecote and a pond which was originally used to farm carp to supply fish for the kitchens.

  5. Continue ahead, signposted to Calstock at the junction, and then keep left on the upper of the paths ahead. Continue until it ends in a junction with another path.

    When photographing bluebells, the flowers that look blue to your eye can end up looking purple in photos. The first thing to check is that your camera isn't on auto white balance as the large amount of blue will cause the camera to shift the white balance towards reds to try to compensate. Another thing to watch out for is that the camera's light metering will often over-expose the blue slightly to get a reasonable amount of red and green light and the "lost blue" can change the balance of the colours. You can get around this by deliberately under-exposing the photo (and checking there is no clipping if your camera has a histogram display) and then brightening it afterwards with editing software.

  6. When you reach the junction, turn right and follow the main path until you reach a fork in the path immediately after a bench overlooking the valley.

    The mines in the valley at Danescombe extracted tin, copper and arsenic. The ore was transported down the tramway which is now the track along the valley and was loaded into boats at Lower Kelly Quay.

  7. At the fork in the path, take the right-hand path to descend into the valley.

    During the 9th Century, the Danes are thought to have landed in the Tamar Estuary; the Cornish allied with the Danes to fight against the Saxons who were at the time pushing into East Cornwall. It is said that Danescombe takes its name from the Danes landing and settling in the valley. At one time this was celebrated in Calstock with locals dressed as Vikings rowing up the river to Danescombe.

  8. Cross the bridge and turn left. Follow the path upstream a short distance until you reach a path on the right. Turn right onto this path and follow it to meet another path beside an old building.
  9. Continue ahead on the path until it eventually joins a track beside a building. Continue a short distance on the track until you reach a path on the left, opposite a passing area on the right.

    The Early Purple Orchid has a Latin name meaning "virile" which is in keeping with the word "orchid" coming from the Greek word for testicle (on account of the shape of the tuber).

    This particular species is the con-man of the plant kingdom, with brilliant purple flowers resembling those of other nectar-rich orchids. When the insects arrive and push through the pollen to investigate the promising flowers, they discover that the flowers contain no nectar.

  10. Turn left up the path opposite the passing area. Follow the path to pass beneath a footbridge and emerge onto a path.
  11. As you emerge from beneath the bridge, turn left onto the path and follow this to merge onto a track. Follow the track beneath a bridge and continue until you reach a public footpath sign pointing towards you, opposite a small path on the right.
  12. At the footpath sign, turn right onto the small path and follow this over a wooden bridge to reach a waymark.
  13. Turn left at the waymark and follow the path beneath the trees to emerge onto a lane at the far end of the path.

    Due to their spectacular flowers, rhododendrons have been popular ornamental plants for over two centuries and the species that we now call the common rhododendron was introduced in 1763. The plants thrive in the UK climate and were once native but were wiped out by the last Ice Age.

  14. Turn left onto the road and carefully follow it uphill a short distance to a junction.

    Cotehele and Calstock lie within the Tamar Valley AONB.

    The Tamar Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty has a similar conservation status to a National Park and encompasses a region around the rivers Tamar, Tavy and Lynher, partly in Cornwall and partly in Devon. This also includes an area of Cornwall and West Devon mining landscape World Heritage Site. It was first suggested in 1963 that the Tamar valley area should be designated but this was only eventually granted in 1995.

  15. Turn right at the junction, signposted Parish Church, and follow the lane to the gate into the churchyard.

    In 2006-7 a team from Exeter University were doing surveys to investigate mediaeval silver mines when they accidentally discovered a Roman Fort. This is only the third one found in Cornwall and is the largest. It is thought to have been in use from the 1st Century AD. It was enclosed by two ramparts and ditches and finds have included remnants of furnace-lining, ore and slag which indicate metalworking was taking place. For a long time there was a suspicion that there might have been a Roman military interest in Cornwall's mineral resources and this is some of the first evidence that supports this.

  16. Go through the churchyard gate and keep right along the path to pass the church door and reach an iron gate leading out of the churchyard.

    Calstock church was consecrated in 1290, is dedicated to St Andrew and is under the Patronage of The Duke of Cornwall. The current building dates from the 15th Century and includes a mediaeval wall painting which was rediscovered during a Victorian restoration. The porch includes a built-in fireplace, the purpose of which is not definitely known but it is thought that this was believed to keep disease out of the church, along the lines of "keep warm or you'll catch a cold".

  17. Go through the gate and turn left onto the lane. Follow the lane until it you reach a level crossing.
  18. Carefully cross the level crossing and turn left on the other side. Follow the lane until you reach a Public Bridleway sign.

    A railway opened in 1872 to bring minerals from more mines in the area to the Calstock incline leading to the quay. The new railway ran for just over 7 miles to Kelly Bray. At the time, there was no main line nearby so the line was not connected to any other. It wasn't until the early 20th Century that the new railway in Plymouth allowed the Calstock railway to be connected, and much of the trackbed of the East Cornwall Mineral Railway was re-used for the Tamar Valley line.

  19. Turn right down the bridleway and follow it until it ends on a lane.

    Okel Tor mine operated between 1849 and 1887 and extracted primarily copper and arsenic. Tin and lead ore (which also contained silver) were also extracted. In 1865, it was recorded as having two engines and employing 107 people: 80 men, 15 boys and 12 bal maidens.

  20. Join the lane ahead then turn left at the waymarked bridleway sign opposite the lime kiln. Follow the path through a kissing gate and along the river until you reach a pedestrian gate into a sports field.

    The name Tamar is documented in the second century and likely to be substantially older. It is thought it might share a common origin with the River Thames and both might stem from an ancient Celtic word meaning "dark". The source of the river is within 4 miles of the North Cornish Coast and the river flows 61 miles south across the peninsula forming the majority of the historic border with Devon. Work is being done by the Environment Agency to improve the water quality of the Tamar and its tributaries by reducing the amount of run-off of phosphate fertilisers into the rivers.

  21. Go through the gate and follow the path along the fence of the sports field, then continue along the river to reach the landing stage for the ferry.

    The Calstock viaduct is part of the Tamar Valley railway that was constructed at the start of the 20th Century and still runs between Gunnislake and Plymouth. The viaduct was built between 1904 and 1907 from 11,148 pre-cast concrete blocks. It is 120 feet high with twelve main arches each 60 feet wide, and one mini-arch at the Calstock end. Originally, a steam-powered lift was attached to it which could raise and lower wagons from the quays over 100 feet below.

  22. From the ferry pontoon, go down the steps to the road and turn left. Follow the road a short distance past the pub until it ends in a junction.
  23. Turn left at the junction and follow Commercial Road a short distance to a junction with Lower Kelly on the left.
  24. Turn left down Lower Kelly Road. Follow the road until you reach Danescombe Valley House at the far end.

    The bridge over Lower Kelly once carried a railway incline leading to Danescombe Quay, built in 1859. It consisted of a 1 in 6 gradient leading to the top of the valley. Wagons were lowered on a rope and raised with the help of a steam engine at the top.

  25. Just past the house, keep left to take the lower of the two tracks ahead. Follow this to reach a large sign for Cotehele House.
  26. Turn left at the Cotehele House sign and follow the path uphill to a junction and continue until you reach a fork in the path.
  27. When you reach the fork in the path, bear left, signposted Cotehele Quay and Mill, and follow the footpath past the chapel to return to the car park.

    In 1483, Sir Richard Edgcumbe joined a rebellion against King Richard III. The rebellion failed and Edgcumbe was pursued by the King's troops into the woods at Cotehele. Edgumbe managed to escape by throwing his hat into the river, giving the impression he had drowned, and lived in exile in Brittany until Henry Tudor took the throne. On his return, Edgcumbe built the chapel in the spot where he had thrown his hat into the river to give thanks for his escape.

Help us with this walk

You can help us to keep this walk as accurate as it possibly can be for others by spotting and feeding back any changes affecting the directions. We'd be very grateful if could you look out for the following:

  • Any stiles, gates or waymark posts referenced in the directions which are no longer there
  • Any stiles referenced in the directions that have been replaced with gates, or vice-versa

Take a photo and email contact@iwalkcornwall.co.uk, or message either IWalkCornwall on facebook or @iwalkc on twitter. If you have any tips for other walkers please let us know, or if you want to tell us that you enjoyed the walk, we'd love to hear that too.

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