Walks in Cornwall with bluebells

These walks usually have nice displays of bluebells in late April and May.

3.2 miles/5.2 km - Easy

King's Wood and Pentewan

A circular walk through the King's Wood Woodland Trust reserve to the lost port of Pentewan, along the trackbed of horse-drawn tramway that once carried china clay to the busy port and via the system of reservoirs and sluices that were used to flush sand out of the harbour. There is a nice display of bluebells down the steep bank at the back of the valley floor.

3.2 miles/5.1 km - Easy

Poundstock to Penfound

A circular walk along country lanes, tracks and through fields to Penfound Manor - thought to be the oldest continually-inhabited ancestral home in England - from Poundstock church and gildhouse - the only surviving mediaeval church house of its kind in Cornwall. There are bluebells along the more shady areas of footpath between Newmill and Penfound Manor.

2.2 miles/3.5 km - Easy-moderate

Blisland to Lavethan Wood

A short circular walk from the village of Blisland through the churchyard, two stretches of the Woodland Trust reserve of Lavethan Wood and land which was once the estates of Lavethan and Barlandew manors, returning via the Holy Well of St Hyacinth and St Pratt. The return route through Lavethan Wood is lined with bluebells in the spring.

2.2 miles/3.5 km - Easy-moderate

Hallwell Plantation to Lesnewth

A short circular walk in the tributary valleys of the River Valency through bluebell woodland beside a stream, and across meadows rich in wildflowers to the ancient Celtic churchyard of Lesnewth. There are bluebells in the woodland section of the walk during the spring.

3.3 miles/5.3 km - Easy-moderate

Lanhydrock Gardens

A fairly short and easy circular walk through Lanhydrock gardens (note that you will need to pay an entry fee unless you are NT member) with plenty of picnic spots along the River Fowey that you can combine with a visit to the house. There are bluebells in the woods alongside the river.

3.6 miles/5.8 km - Easy-moderate

St Newlyn East and Lappa Valley

A circular walk from St Newlyn East through the woods of the Lappa Valley where the Steam Railway now encompasses what was one of the most famous mines in Cornwall during Victorian times and the riverbeds are still stained red. There are nice bluebells in Metha Wood.

3.7 miles/5.9 km - Easy-moderate

Newmills to Tregadillett

A circular walk in the Kensey valley from the end of the steam railway at Newmills, through the bluebell woods at Trebursye, to the Eliot Arms in Tregadillett and returning to Newmills via the remains of a prehistoric fort, to catch the steam train back to Launceston. There are nice displays of bluebells in Trebursye Wood, just after you re-enter the woods from the field.

3.8 miles/6.1 km - Easy-moderate

Lanhydrock to Respryn

A circular walk through the mature broadleaf woodland in the less well-known areas of the Lanhydrock estate, through bluebell woods and along the River Fowey, past the mediaeval bridge at Respryn, built after numerous prayers for safe passage in the ford-side chapel, had not resulted in the desired outcome. There are bluebells in the woods alongside the river.

3.8 miles/6.1 km - Easy-moderate

St Mabyn to Pencarrow House

A fairly easy circular walk from St Mabyn past the church and inn and through rolling countryside to Pencarrow House and its magnificent gardens. The are lovely bluebells in the gardens at Pencarrow, particularly in the wooded areas on the western side of the house.

4 miles/6.4 km - Easy-moderate

St Keverne to Porthallow

A circular walk through woods and meadows to Porthoustock and Porthallow from St Keverne, settled in the Dark Ages by Celtic monks trading with Brittany There are some nice bluebells near the start of the walk as you descend into the woods near Trenoweth Farm.

4.3 miles/7 km - Easy-moderate

Tehidy Country Park to Deadman's Cove

A circular walk through the wildlife reserve and bluebell woodland of Tehidy Country Park to Deadman's Cove and the North Cliffs where many sailing ships were wrecked before the Godrevy Lighthouse was built. There are some nice bluebells in the North Cliff Plantation when you re-enter Tehidy woods towards the end of the walk.

5 miles/8.1 km - Easy-moderate

Camelford to Watergate

A circular walk from Camelford through bluebell woods along the Camel valley to the Celtic churchyard of Advent and the Neolithic remains on the edge of Bodmin Moor. There is an impressive display of bluebells in the woodland opposite Fenteroon Farm.

5.2 miles/8.4 km - Easy-moderate

Porth Reservoir

A circular walk through the wildlife reserve around the reservoir lake, past crumbling relics of the abandoned Nanswhyden estate and via farmland, a mill and wooded vales that were also once part of the great estate. There are some nice bluebells in the nature reserve in the woods beside the reservoir.

6.2 miles/10 km - Easy-moderate

The Loe

A circular walk around the Loe Pool, the largest natural freshwater lake in Cornwall, and along the Loe Bar, one of Cornwall's most treacherous beaches on which 100 of those onboard the HMS Anson drowned metres from the shore, motivating the invention of the rocket lifesaving apparatus that saved thousands of lives.

6.8 miles/10.9 km - Easy-moderate

Wadebridge to Polbrock

A circular walk from Wadebridge through the Treraven nature reserve, bluebell woodland at Hustyn Mill and meadows along the River Camel to Polbrock, returning along the Camel Trail. There are some nice bluebells in Hustyn Wood as you descend to the stream.

2.6 miles/4.2 km - Moderate

Boscastle to Minster Church

A short circular walk from Boscastle through bluebell woodland alongside the River Valency to the ancient Celtic churchyard and sacred spring at Minster, returning along the River Jordan, beside which Bottreaux Castle was once situated, and Boscastle's Old Road. There are bluebells in the woods near the river in the Valency Valley.

2.7 miles/4.3 km - Moderate

Trebarwith Valley

A fairly short circular walk exploring Trebarwith Valley, a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in North Cornwall. The walk includes bluebell woodland, panoramic views from both sides of the valley and the Trebarwith Nature Reserve. There are bluebells in the woods above Jeffrey's Pit.

3 miles/4.8 km - Moderate

Millook to Trebarfoote

A circular walk through Woodland Trust reserves of the ancient Millook woods, meadows to the former smuggling den and 1920s wild party venue of Trebarfoote, and along the coast from Cancleave Strand to Millook Haven where colliding continents have melted and folded the rocks like toffee. There are bluebells beside the bridge crossing the river in the Millook Valley.

3.6 miles/5.8 km - Moderate

Delabole

A circular walk around Delabole past the slate quarry, along back lanes and tracks, and through fields and bluebell woods. There are some nice bluebells in Helland Barton woods.

3.9 miles/6.2 km - Moderate

Bossiney, St Nectan's Glen and Rocky Valley

A short circular walk through the woods of St Nectan's Glen and canyons of Rocky Valley, past the ruined mills and labyrinthine carvings, and along the coast to the golden sandy cove at Bossiney Haven. There are bluebells in the woods at Rocky Valley.

3.9 miles/6.2 km - Moderate

Cotehele to Metherell

A circular walk via the quays, woods, engine house and mills of the Cotehele Estate where by Georgian times the house had become a tourist attraction because it was so antiquated, and has changed little since. There is an impressive display of bluebells along the paths in the Danescombe valley just past the Cotehele gardens.

3.9 miles/6.3 km - Moderate

St Just to Messack Point

A circular walk along both sides of St Just creek to Messack Point where there are spectacular views over one of the largest natural harbours in the world. There are bluebells along the path through the woods from Messack Point.

4.2 miles/6.7 km - Moderate

Coombe and Old Kea

A circular walk on the creeks of the Fal river network settled by Celtic monks where the ruin of a huge mediaeval church still towers above the trees There are nice displays of bluebells at several points along the route with the most impressive being in the woods at the top of Cowlands Creek.

4.3 miles/6.9 km - Moderate

Crackington Haven to The Strangles

A circular walk from Crackington Haven, with panoramic views of the Shipwreck Coast, to the long, sandy Strangles beach, returning through bluebell woodland along the Ludon river valley. There are bluebells in the woods along the Ludon valley.

4.4 miles/7.1 km - Moderate

Sandymouth to Coombe Valley

A circular walk from Sandymouth beach, via the Landmark Trust's historic buildings of Coombe and a derelict mill which is one of the largest bat colonies in England, to the remains of the once great manor of Stowe Barton, the interior furnishings of which can be seen in Prideaux Place at Padstow.

4.8 miles/7.8 km - Moderate

Luxulyan Valley to Prideaux

A circular walk through the World Heritage site of the Luxulyan Valley and surrounding countryside, over the massive viaduct supporting a horse-drawn tram route to Newquay and along the leat that fed Charlestown Harbour. There are bluebells in the woods just after the route crosses the Treffry viaduct.

5.1 miles/8.1 km - Moderate

Deadman's Cove to Red River Valley

A circular walk along a coast of shipwrecks and smugglers from Deadman's Cove to Hell's Mouth, past the collapse of the North Cliffs that went viral on YouTube, and returning through the nature reserve along the Red River Valley. The are bluebells along the route at Menadarva and along the lane at Coombe.

5.1 miles/8.2 km - Moderate

Slate quarry trail

A circular route around historic slate quarries which have now been reclaimed by Nature to the ancient quarry at Delabole which was the largest man-made hole in Europe for many years and is still worked, returning via the restored engine house overlooking Trebarwith Valley. There are bluebells in the woods above Jeffrey's Pit.

5.2 miles/8.4 km - Moderate

Pendower Beach to Veryan

A circular walk from Pendower Beach to Veryan via Nare Head where, in Victorian times, an unhappily married fisherman lived alone the in cliff-edge cottage, lowering his boat on a rope over the cliff and returning once a week to Veryan to bring his wife fish. There are bluebells in the woodland on the path from Melinsey in the spring.

5.3 miles/8.5 km - Moderate

Lanhydrock to Restormel

A circular walk from the mediaeval bridge at Respryn along the River Fowey through the bluebell woodland of the Lanhydrock Estate to the circular Norman castle at Restormel which had a pressurised piped water system 700 years ahead of its time. There are bluebells in the woods at Lanhydrock alongside the river.

5.3 miles/8.6 km - Moderate

Little Petherick Creek and the Camel Trail

A circular walk via the Victorian obelisk overlooking Padstow, the creek-side church at Little Petherick and the tidal enclosure of Sea Mills, returning via the Camel Trail bridge which carried the railway that brought the first Victorian tourists to Padstow and Cornish fish to London. There are bluebells in the areas of woodland around Credis Creek and approaching Little Petherick.

5.6 miles/9 km - Moderate

Delabole to Lanteglos

A circular walk through bluebell woodland, fields and along back lanes from Delabole to Camelford's parish church at Lanteglos returning via the Iron Age forts of Castle Goff and Delinuth Camp. There are some nice bluebells in Helland Barton woods.

5.6 miles/9.0 km - Moderate

Rame Head and Cawsand

A circular walk around Rame Head - the southeastern corner of Cornwall - past the mediaeval chapel and the remains of a huge gun battery, now a nature reserve, on Penlee Point to Cawsand which was once the smuggling capital of Cornwall. There are bluebells in the woods as you descend from Penlee Point towards Cawsand.

6.1 miles/9.9 km - Moderate

Dunmere, Penhargard and Bodmin Jail

A circular walk along the River Camel from Dunmere through bluebell woods and fields to Penhargard, and along an ancient route lined with wildflowers to Bodmin's historic Jail. There are some nice bluebells along the path from Bodiniel when it enters the woods just after the solar farm.

6.1 miles/9.7 km - Moderate

Egloshayle to Dinham Bridge

A circular walk in the Allen Valley from Egloshayle though the broadleaf woodland alongside the River Allen past the mills of Hingham and Lemail, returning via the Celtic Three Holed Cross and the remains of Castle Killibury which from mediaeval Welsh texts is thought might be one of King Arthur's several castles. There are often some nice displays of bluebells just after Lemail Mill as you ascend the Allen Valley from Hingham Mill.

6.1 miles/9.8 km - Moderate

St Just-in-Roseland to St Mawes

A circular walk on the Roseland peninsula to St Mawes from the subtropical gardens of St Just church, along Carrick Roads where Europe's only fishery entirely under sail catch oysters using the traditional methods that have sustained their stocks. There are bluebells in the woods along the path from the creek to Nanshuttal.

6.2 miles/10 km - Moderate

Boscastle to Rocky Valley

A circular walk from Boscastle along the dramatic coastline of islands and arches towards Tintagel, following the cascading river up Rocky Valley past the ruined mills and labyrinthine carvings and returning via the mediaeval churches of Trethevy, Trevalga and Forrabury. There are bluebells in the woods at Rocky Valley and also along the coast.

6.8 miles/10.9 km - Moderate

Castle-an-dinas

A mostly circular walk from the Castle-an-dinas Iron Age hillfort with 360 degree views across Cornwall, then into the valley to the River Menalhyl, followed by wooded paths lined with primroses, bluebells and wild garlic, and lanes with vibrant wildflowers. There are bluebells along the path leading up from the river to Trewolvas.

3.2 miles/5.2 km - Moderate-strenuous

Crackington Haven to St Genny's Church

A circular walk from the surf beach at Crackington Haven to the mediaeval church at St Genny's via the imposing Penkenna Point, where there are spectacular views of the bay and the secluded landing points used by some of North Cornwall's most notorious smugglers and wreckers. There are bluebells in the woods along the final valley on the route.

3.9 miles/6.3 km - Moderate-strenuous

Portholland to Portloe

A circular walk with lovely views of Veryan Bay to the pretty fishing village of Portloe from West Portholland where one of the last of Cornwall's mediaeval coastal farmsteads has survived.

4.8 miles/7.7 km - Moderate-strenuous

Millook Haven to Dizzard

A circular walk through the Millook woodland reserves to the ancient gnarled oak forest of The Dizzard, returning along the coast with panoramic views to Hartland Point, to the chevron-folded cliffs and honeycomb reefs of Millook Haven. There are bluebells in the coastal woodland at Dizzard and beside the bridge crossing the river in the Millook Valley.

5 miles/8 km - Moderate-strenuous

Kilkhampton to the Coombe valley

A circular walk though the wildflowers of the Kilkhampton Common nature reserve and woods of the Coombe Valley, returning via the remains of the Norman castle at Penstowe which consisted of a stone tower perched on the top of a steep hill but surrounded by two baileys, rather than the usual one, the reason for which is a mystery.

5.1 miles/8.2 km - Moderate-strenuous

Helford and Frenchman's Creek

A circular walk through the wooded valleys of the Helford River including the most famous - Frenchman's Creek - which is still as pristine as when it inspired Daphne Du Maurier's novel There are some nice bluebells towards the end of the walk as you descend into the woods from Kestle Barton.

5.1 miles/8.2 km - Moderate-strenuous

Lamorna and St Loy

A circular walk visiting prehistoric stone circles, crosses and tombs and along the granite cliffs from Lamorna Cove to the sea-polished boulders of St Loy's Cove where sailors of a sinking vessel were able to climb to safety onto a large ship which had been wrecked there seven months before. There are bluebells in the woods above St Loy's Cove.

5.1 miles/8.2 km - Moderate-strenuous

St Neot Two Valleys

A circular walk from St Neot though the valley of the River Loveny, past a prehistoric settlement, through bluebell woodland and along the River Fowey, and returning via the church, famous for its mediaeval stained glass. There are nice displays of bluebells in the woods near Lower Bowden.

5.2 miles/8.4 km - Moderate-strenuous

Portreath and Tehidy Country Park

A circular walk along the rugged North Cliffs hiding smuggler's coves such as Ralph's Cupboard, to the sandy beach and historic mining port of Portreath, returning via the bluebell woodland of Illogan and Tehidy Country Park. There are bluebells in Illogan Woods and even more near the Eastern Lodge of Tehidy Country Park.

5.9 miles/9.5 km - Moderate-strenuous

Cotehele to Calstock

A circular walk through the gardens of Cotehele to Calstock where Cornwall's largest Roman fort once stood, the Vikings allied with the Cornish to fight off the Saxons, and more recently railway wagons were lifted over 100ft by steam power from the quay to the top of the viaduct. There is an impressive display of bluebells along the paths in the Danescombe valley just past the Cotehele gardens.

6 miles/9.6 km - Moderate-strenuous

Seaton to Millendreath

A circular walk in an area of Cornwall so off the beaten track that No Man's Land is a real place name and a breeding colony of monkeys live in the woodland, in a sanctuary set up by father of the classical guitarist, John Williams. There are bluebells along the Bridleway from Keveral Farm to Seaton.

6.6 miles/10.6 km - Moderate-strenuous

Inny Valleys from Altarnun

A circular walk around the valleys of the River Inny and Penpont Water to the mediaeval church at Laneast and the old bridge at Gimlett's Mill from the 15th century "Cathedral of the Moors" in Altarnun, set beside a 6th Century Celtic cross where churches and chapels had been throughout the Dark Ages.

3.4 miles/5.4 km - Strenuous

Poundstock to Millook

A circular walk from Poundstock through bluebell woods along the river to the pretty pebbles and chevron-folded cliffs of Millook Haven and along the coast path with panoramic views from Bridwill Point. There are bluebells in the woods approaching Millook Haven.

4.3 miles/7.0 km - Strenuous

St Gennys Church to Dizzard

A circular walk at St Gennys from the mediaeval church, via the smuggling routes though bluebell woods along the stream and an Iron Age clifftop fort crumbling into the sea, to some of North Cornwall's most remote coastline. There are bluebells in the woods below St Gennys and along the coast path from Chipman Point.

5.4 miles/8.7 km - Strenuous

Boscastle to Buckator

A circular walk along the coastline from Boscastle via the Pentargon waterfall to the seal colony at Buckator, returning along the Valency valley. There are bluebells in the woods near the river in the Valency Valley.

6.4 miles/10.3 km - Strenuous

Crackington Haven to Widemouth

A (bus-assisted) one-way walk along the Shipwreck Coast from Crackington Haven to Widemouth Bay passing the bluebell woodland of ancient twisted oaks at The Dizzard, chevron folded rocks and honeycomb reefs of Millook Haven and fossil beds of Wanson Mouth. There are bluebells in the coastal woodland at Dizzard.