Wildlife spotting

Seal spotting

The Cornwall Seal Group gather information about the numbers of seals in each location to study migration behaviour. Each seal has a unique pattern of spots which is like a fingerprint, allowing individuals to be identified so photos are also very useful.

How you can help

The Cornwall Seal Group gather information about the numbers of seals in each location to study migration behaviour. Each seal has a unique pattern of spots which is like a fingerprint, allowing individuals to be identified so photos are also very useful.

If you see one or more seals, take a photo if possible but never approach the seals to take a photo - use a zoom from a clifftop. Send the location, date, number of seals and photos if you have them to sue@cornwallsealgroup.co.uk.

We've compiled a list of walks with a good chance of seeing seals.

To help protect seals, also avoid participating in any tourism activities that involve feeding seals and educate others about how learned begging behaviour causes injuries to seals from boat propellers and fish hooks, and has the potential to put small children at risk fishing with bait for crabs.

In the unlikely event that you are witness to wildlife disturbance or harassment, call the Cornwall Marine and Coastal Code Group 24 hour disturbance hotline 0345 2012626. A verbal report should be supported with video footage and/or photographic evidence if possible.

Recording other wildlife

You can also contribute sightings for any wildlife (no matter how common) to help with scientific research via the Cornwall & amp; Scillies online recording website. They also have an app (search the app store for ORKS) which can automatically fill in your current location so you can record things easily on your walks.